Unit #1Unit #2Unit #3Unit #4Unit #5Unit #6Unit #7Unit #8Unit #9Unit #10
spacerUNIT # 5  
spacerspacerIntroduction
spacerspacerObjectives
spacerspacerReading


spacer5.1 Ionic
spacerBonding

spacerIonic Bonding in Sodium Chloride
spacerIonic Bonding in Magnesium Chloride
spacerProperties of Ionic Compounds
spacer5.2 Covalent
spacerBonding
spacer5.3 Polar Covalent
spacerBonding

spacer5.4 Bond
spacerDipoles

spacer5.5 Electroneg-
spacerativity

spacer5.6 Classification
spacerof Bond Type
spacer5.7 Polarity of
spacerMolecules
spacer5.8 Writing
spacerChemical
spacerFormulae
spacerWriting formulas containing simple ions
spacerWriting formulas containing  polyatomic ions
spacerUsing parentheses in formula writing
spacer5.9 Information in
spacera Chemical
spacerFormula
spacerNumber ratio of atoms
spacerNumber ratio of ions
spacer5.10 Oxidation
spacerNumbers
spacerAssignment of Oxidation Numbers


spacerspacerProblems
spacer1 | 2

Unit # 5 - The Structure of Compounds
Compounds

  1. Consider the following substances:

    lead (II) bromide | lithium chloride | potassium iodide | sugar | hydrogen chloride | sulfur | copper

    • (a) Name the substance(s) that conduct electricity in the solid state. Explain.
    • (b) Name the substance(s) that conduct electricity both in the liquid state (i.e. when molten) and in aqueous solution. Explain.
    • (c) Name the substance(s) that do not conduct electricity themselves but form conducting liquids when dissolved in water. Explain.
    • (d) Name the substance(s) that do not conduct electricity. Explain.
  2. Take a look at the properties of two bromine-containing compounds:
    1. hydrogen bromide, HBr,
    2. sodium bromide, NaBr.

     
    Electrical Conductivity
      Solid Liquid Aqueous Solution
    HBr
    very low
    very low
    high
    NaBr
    very low
    high
    high

    • (a) The difference in conductivities of these two compounds can be explained in terms of bonding. Describe the bonding in these two compounds.
    • (b) Explain the difference in electrical conductivity for NaBr in the solid state and in the liquid state.
    • (c) Explain the difference in electrical conductivity for HBr in aqueous solution and in the solid and liquid states.
    • (d) Write the chemical equation which describes the behaviour of HBr in aqueous solution.
  3. Describe the trends in the electronegativities of the elements across a row and down a column of the periodic table.
  4. Which element in the periodic table has the largest electronegativity?
  5. Which element in the periodic table has the smallest electronegativity?
  6. Arrange the following elements in order of decreasing electronegativity.

    • (a) Mg, Al, P, O, K
    • (b) C, Si, Ga, O, Ca
    • (b) P, As, Cl, S, Mg
  7. Explain why CO2 has no dipole moment.
  8. Explain why H2O is a polar molecule.
  9. Explain why I2 is a nonpolar covalent compound.
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