Unit #1Unit #2Unit #3Unit #4Unit #5Unit #6Unit #7Unit #8Unit #9Unit #10
spacerUNIT # 5  
spacerspacerIntroduction
spacerspacerObjectives
spacerspacerReading


spacer5.1 Ionic
spacerBonding

spacerIonic Bonding in Sodium Chloride
spacerIonic Bonding in Magnesium Chloride
spacerProperties of Ionic Compounds
spacer5.2 Covalent
spacerBonding
spacer5.3 Polar Covalent
spacerBonding

spacer5.4 Bond
spacerDipoles

spacer5.5 Electroneg-
spacerativity

spacer5.6 Classification
spacerof Bond Type
spacer5.7 Polarity of
spacerMolecules
spacer5.8 Writing
spacerChemical
spacerFormulae
spacerWriting formulas containing simple ions
spacerWriting formulas containing  polyatomic ions
spacerUsing parentheses in formula writing
spacer5.9 Information in
spacera Chemical
spacerFormula
spacerNumber ratio of atoms
spacerNumber ratio of ions
spacer5.10 Oxidation
spacerNumbers
spacerAssignment of Oxidation Numbers


spacerspacerProblems
spacer1 | 2

Unit #5 COMPOUNDS

Objectives

On completion of the unit you should be able to:

  1. identify the elements in the periodic table which tend to combine to form ionic compounds.
  2. define empirical formula.
  3. write the simplest formula of ionic compounds, given the elements which combine to form the compound.
  4. define "ionic bond".
  5. explain why ionic compounds conduct electricity in liquid state, but not in solid state.
  6. explain the high melting points of ionic compounds.
  7. define and give examples of molecular compounds.
  8. write the molecular formula, electron dot formula and structural formula for simple molecules.
  9. explain the difference between polar and nonpolar bonds.
  10. define electronegativity.
  11. use electronegativity values to predict if a bond will be ionic polar covalent or nonpolar covalent.
  12. predict whether simple molecules will be polar or nonpolar.
  13. write the formulas of simple polyatomic ions.
  14. write the formulas of compounds which contain polyatomic ions.
  15. calculate the oxidation number of atoms in elements, compounds and polyatomic ions.

 

 

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