Unit #1Unit #2Unit #3Unit #4Unit #5Unit #6Unit #7Unit #8Unit #9Unit #10
spacerUNIT # 4  
spacerspacerIntroduction
spacerspacerObjectives
spacerspacerReading


spacer4.1 The Periods
spacer4.2 The Groups
spacerGroup IA - Alkali metals
spacerGroup IIA - Alkaline earth metals
spacerGroup VIIA - Halogens
spacerGroup VIIIA - Noble gases
spacer4.3 Metals,
spacerNonmetals,
spacerSemimetals

spacerProperties of Metals
spacerProperties of Nommetals
spacerProperties of Semimetals
spacerSummary
spacer4.4 Metallic
spacerBonding

spacer4.5 Octet
spacerRule

spacer4.6 Ions
spacer
4.7 Covalent
spacerBonding

spacerCovalent Bonding & Groups
spacer
4.8 Atomic
spacerSize

spacer
4.9 Ionic
spacerSize

spacerIonic Size of Metal Ions
spacerIonic Size of Nonmetal Ions
spacerIonic Size for Isoelectronic Series
spacer
4.10 mp/bp
spacerTrends
spacer
4.11 Metallic
spacerTrend


spacer** More
spacerspacerperiodic
spacerTrends
**


spacerspacerProblems
spacer1 | 2 | 3
spacerspacerCrossword
spacerspacerHow well do you
spacerknow your
spacerPeriodic Table?

Unit #4THE PERIODIC TABLE

4.4 - Metallic Bonding

Metals have a tendency of forming cations. Solid crystalline metals can be pictured as a three-dimensional array of positive ions that have fixed positions in the crystal. The valence electrons of these ions move freely throughout the crystal.


Click on the copper wire below to see the electrons moving freely through the metal.

In the solid, the free moving electrons allow for high thermal and electrical conductivity (i.e. the electrons can carry the heat energy and electricity). The bonding of atoms in metals is referred to as metallic bonds.

Metallic Bonding

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