Unit #1Unit #2Unit #3Unit #4Unit #5Unit #6Unit #7Unit #8Unit #9Unit #10
spacerUNIT # 4  
spacerspacerIntroduction
spacerspacerObjectives
spacerspacerReading


spacer4.1 The Periods
spacer4.2 The Groups
spacerGroup IA - Alkali metals
spacerGroup IIA - Alkaline earth metals
spacerGroup VIIA - Halogens
spacerGroup VIIIA - Noble gases
spacer4.3 Metals,
spacerNonmetals,
spacerSemimetals

spacerProperties of Metals
spacerProperties of Nommetals
spacerProperties of Semimetals
spacerSummary
spacer4.4 Metallic
spacerBonding

spacer4.5 Octet
spacerRule

spacer4.6 Ions
spacer
4.7 Covalent
spacerBonding

spacerCovalent Bonding & Groups
spacer
4.8 Atomic
spacerSize

spacer
4.9 Ionic
spacerSize

spacerIonic Size of Metal Ions
spacerIonic Size of Nonmetal Ions
spacerIonic Size for Isoelectronic Series
spacer
4.10 mp/bp
spacerTrends
spacer
4.11 Metallic
spacerTrend


spacer** More
spacerspacerperiodic
spacerTrends
**


spacerspacerProblems
spacer1 | 2 | 3
spacerspacerCrossword
spacerspacerHow well do you
spacerknow your
spacerPeriodic Table?

Unit #4THE PERIODIC TABLE

4.1 - The Periods

The periodic table, as we know it today, is an array of the elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number. When the elements are arranged in order of increasing atomic number, the physical and chemical properties of the elements vary periodically at regular intervals. This relationship is known as the periodic law.

Click on the chemist's tools and find periodic table icon, Periodic table. Click and view the periodic table as we know it today. Click on a few of the elements on the periodic table and find out the element's name, its atomic number and its atomic mass. You'll be using the periodic table quite often throughout the course.

There are seven periods of elements in the periodic table.


Each period has a variation in physical and chemical properties. It starts with reactive metals on the left side and ends with the nonreactive noble gas on the right side.

The number of the period gives the number of the outermost principal energy level that the valence electron(s) occupies. This is best illustrated by reviewing the arrangement of electrons in principal energy levels and the Bohr diagrams.

Need a review?
(section 3.3.1)
Take a look at a few examples:


Follow these interesting links:

A short history of the periodic table.
  View the early periodic table, Mendeleev's periodic table
   

 

Section 5.2
The Periodic Table Periods and Groups ..p106

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