Unit #1Unit #2Unit #3Unit #4Unit #5Unit #6Unit #7Unit #8Unit #9Unit #10
spacerUNIT # 1  
spacerspacerIntroduction
spacerspacerObjectives
spacerspacerReading

spacer1.1
Metric
spacerSystem
spacerSI System
spacerBritish System

spacer1.2 Temperature
spacerMeasure-
spacerments

spacer1.3 Scientific
spacerNotation

spacer1.4 Dimensional
spacerAnalysis

spacer1.5 Precision,
spacerAccuracy,
spacerUncertainty

spacerLimitation of the Measuring Instrument
spacerAnalysis of the Limitation of a Ruler
spacerAnalysis of the Limitation of another Ruler
spacer1.6 Significant
spacerFigures

spacerThe Magnitude and Reliability of the Measurement
spacerFive Rules for Determining the number of Significant Figures in a Measurement

spacer1.7 Calculations
spacerInvolving
spacerSignificant
spacerFigures
spacerRules for Rounding off Numbers
spacerRules for Addition  and Subtraction

spacerRules for Multiplication and Division

spacer1.8 Density
spacerDensity and Temperature
spacer1.9 Specific
spacerGravity
spacerspacerProblems
spacer1 | 2 | 3
   

MEASUREMENT

1.4 - Dimensional Analysis

Many calculations in chemistry require that we convert quantities from one set of units to another. Whether we are trying to convert between the British system of units and the SI system of units, or within the SI system of units, we can do this by using conversion factors.

For examples,

  1. If we wish to convert between meter and inch, we would need the conversion factor 1 meter = 39 inches.
  2. If we wish to convert between kilogram and pound, we would need the conversion factor 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds.
  3. If we wish to convert between liter and milliliter, we would need the conversion factor 1 liter = 1000 milliliter.

The approach to problem solving via inspecting the units of measurments is called dimensional analysis. The basic setup is ummarized in the following steps:

  1. Identify the unit in the given quantity of measurement. This is your information given.
  2. Identify the unit that you need to present the answer. This is your information sought.
  3. Figure out the conversion factor to convert the unit from I to II and write the conversion factor as a fraction.
  4. Set up the problem as shown below to ensure that units cancel in such a way that you are left with the unit in II.
(information given) x (conversion factor(s)) = information sought

 

Do you know how to express 0.5 mg in µg?


Click on the button if you are unsure.

Section 2.8
Dimensional Analysis Method of Problem Solving for Conversions ..p33

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