Unit #1Unit #2Unit #3Unit #4Unit #5Unit #6Unit #7Unit #8Unit #9Unit #10
spacerUNIT # 1  
spacerspacerIntroduction
spacerspacerObjectives
spacerspacerReading

spacer1.1
Metric
spacerSystem
spacerSI System
spacerBritish System

spacer1.2 Temperature
spacerMeasure-
spacerments

spacer1.3 Scientific
spacerNotation

spacer1.4 Dimensional
spacerAnalysis

spacer1.5 Precision,
spacerAccuracy,
spacerUncertainty

spacerLimitation of the Measuring Instrument
spacerAnalysis of the Limitation of a Ruler
spacerAnalysis of the Limitation of another Ruler
spacer1.6 Significant
spacerFigures

spacerThe Magnitude and Reliability of the Measurement
spacerFive Rules for Determining the number of Significant Figures in a Measurement

spacer1.7 Calculations
spacerInvolving
spacerSignificant
spacerFigures
spacerRules for Rounding off Numbers
spacerRules for Addition  and Subtraction

spacerRules for Multiplication and Division

spacer1.8 Density
spacerDensity and Temperature
spacer1.9 Specific
spacerGravity
spacerspacerProblems
spacer1 | 2 | 3
   

MEASUREMENT

1.1 - Metric System

Scientists from around the world use one set of units to communicate information. This set of units is known as the International System of Units, or more commonly referred to as the SI system.

There are many SI base units of measurements. For this course, we will concentrate on the 5 base units listed below:

  1. For a measurement of MASS, the base unit is kilogram.
  2. For a measurment of LENGTH, the base unit is meter.
  3. For a measurement of VOLUME**, the base unit is liter.
  4. For a measurement of TIME, the base unit is second.
  5. For a measurement of TEMPERATURE, the base unit is kelvin.

**
The base units of length and volume are connected in the SI system. By definition, a liter is equal to the volume of a cube exactly 10 cm in length, 10 cm width, and 10 cm height. Because the volume of the cube is 1000 cm3 and a liter contains 1000 milliliters, 1 milliliter is equivalent to 1 cm3.

1 mL = 1cm3


The gram was originally defined as the mass of 1 mL of water at 4 oC.

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Chemistry Department - 3700 Willingdon Avenue
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